Upworthy: Voter fraud isn’t the problem — voter suppression is. Meet the man who wants to solve it.

After four years as a member of Missouri’s House of Representatives and another four as its secretary of state, Jason Kander took a chance and ran for the U.S. Senate in 2016.

While the fresh-faced 35-year-old would ultimately come up short in his bid to unseat incumbent Sen. Roy Blunt in the 2016 election, the race was a whole lot closer than many expected. A Democrat in a traditionally red state, Kander came within just 3 points of Blunt. For comparison, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton lost the state by 19 points.

Though unsuccessful, the campaign helped Kander reach a whole new audience when one of his ads — in which he, a former Army captain and Afghanistan veteran, assembled a rifle while blindfolded — went viral. In defeat, Kander’s star only continued to rise.

Within days of the election, political insiders began speculating what Kander’s next move could be, with some even floating him as a possible presidential candidate in 2020.

But that’s not in the cards for him — at least not yet.

In his final days as Missouri’s secretary of state, Kander delivered an impassioned plea to the state’s lawmakers, asking them to show restraint when it comes to implementing new laws that would suppress voter turnout.

“I’m going to be brief today because I recognize that most of you and your families didn’t come here today to listen to me,” he said. “And frankly, most of you are not going to like what it is I have to say.”

What followed was a powerful case against disenfranchising eligible voters in the name of stopping voter-impersonation fraud, a cause close to his heart that would follow him to his next endeavor.

“We have actually already had this debate in America,” said Kander. “American heroes faced down batons and dogs and firehoses to march across a bridge in Selma.”

Fresh out of office, on Feb. 7, Kander announced the launch of Let America Vote, a national organization dedicated to fighting voter suppression.

Though those who support voting restrictions such as voter ID laws claim their purpose is to prevent voter fraud, in effect, those laws only make it harder for eligible voters to cast a ballot.

The problem with restrictive voter ID measures goes far beyond Missouri, and Kander knows this. That’s why the former chief election official is making it his mission to fight the wave of ongoing voter suppression efforts happening now in at least 20 states. Combine that with the fact that President Trump has made repeated claims that there were more than 3 million ballots illegally cast in the 2016 election (even though the data shows that to be untrue), and it’s pretty clear that someone needs to step up to defend the right to vote.

Kander wants to be that someone.

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